Sanwo-Olu signs C40 landmark air quality declaration

edf sanwo olu signing the anti open grazing law on monday x
edf sanwo olu signing the anti open grazing law on monday x

By Sarafina Christopher and Augusta Uchediunor

Lagos State Governor, Babajide Sanwu-Olu has signed the C40 Clean Air Cities Declaration alongside Abidjan, Accra, Addis Ababa, Dakar, Ekurhuleni, Freetown, Johannesburg, Nairobi, and Tshwane as efforts to improve air quality.

In a statement issued late Saturday, the governor announced that Lagos is committed to improving air quality for its citizens.

Sanwu-Olu said that he was proud to join the mayors and governors of nine other African cities in making an unprecedented, ambitious commitment.

The statement read in part: “Under the Clean Air Cities Declaration, Lagos is improving public transport as a key component of Lago’s strategy to reduce air pollution.

“The city will expand the bus rapid transit (BRT) network, installing new terminal hubs and lines allowing for additional users and trips.”

“A low-emission bus pilot, replacement of older vehicles by 2025, and improved fuel quality standards will reduce public transport pollution.”

“Improved walking and cycling infrastructure by 2025 will increase active mobility, further reducing demand for private transport.”

“Other actions include rehabilitating three illegal waste dumping sites, increasing the uptake of LPG for cooking, and promoting solar photovoltaic systems on buildings.”

“Air pollution has become the second largest cause of death on the African continent, due in part to rapid urbanisation and industrialisation.

“Approximately 1.1 million deaths per year have been linked to air pollution across Africa, according to a Global Burden of Disease Study.”

“Approximately 59 million people across the ten African cities stand to benefit from cleaner air and improved health through commitments that are estimated to prevent as many as 10,000,”

“Early deaths linked to air pollution exposure, as well as more than 300,000 hospitalisations, resulted in US$ 9.4 billion in annual savings from averted deaths and hospitalisations.

“If Lagos reduces its PM2.5 concentration to 35 μg/m3 (World Health Organisation (WHO) Interim Target 3) by 2030, it could prevent 2,800 deaths and 155,000 hospitalisations per year.”

“This would save $2.3 billion annually (from avoided deaths and hospitalisations).”

According to it, if Lagos reduces its NO2 concentration to 10ppb (WHO Air Quality Guideline), it will prevent 2,300 asthma incidences per year.

“This will save U.S.$ 200 million annually in related healthcare costs.

“Swift, unprecedented and collaborative action is needed to address the sources of pollution that are harming our health and heating our planet,” the statement read.

NAN

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